Annals of Shalmaneser III

Year 2 (858, BC)

Against the cites of Ahûni and the city of Dabigu

This translation is based on that of Daniel David Luckenbill in Ancient Records of Assyria and Babylonia, pp. 200-252 (Chicago, 1926). My contribution has been to update the language and place names—Modern names have been used where possible. Please report errors to me (link at end of page). -Alan Humm

The monolith inscription (Kurkh Stele)

(2.13–30) In the year named after me, on the 13th of Airu, I left from [Nineveh]. I crossed the Tigris, marched across the lands of Hasamu and Dihnunu, and approached Til-bursip, the fortress of Ahûni, son of Adini. He, trusted in the size of his army, and came out to fight me; I accomplished his overthrow. I trapped him in [his city]. From there I departed, and crossed the Euphrates in goat-skin rafts at flood-time. I stormed and captured the cities of …gâ, Tagi……Sûrunu, Paripa, Tilbasherê, and Dabigu—six of Ahûni’s strong cities and killed many of his soldiers, carrying off their spoil. I destroyed, devastated, and set fire to 200 nearby cities, then moved on from Dabigu to Sazabê, the fortress of Sangara of Carchemish. I stormed and captured the city, killed many of his soldiers, carried off their spoil, and destroyed, devastated, and set fire to the nearby cities. All the kings of the land of Amurru grew terrified at the approach of my mighty, awe-inspiring weapons, and my grim warfare, and they prostrated themselves at my feet. From of the Hattinites, I received three talents of gold, 100 talents of silver, 300 talents of copper, 300 talents of iron, 1,000 copper vessels, 1,000 brightly colored wool and linen garments, his daughter with her expensive dowry, 20 talents of purple wool, 500 cattle, and 5,000 sheep. I imposed one talent of silver, two talents of purple wool, and 200 cedar logs, upon him as his tribute. I received it annually in my city Assur. I received from Haiânu son of Gabbari, who lived at the foot of Mount Amanus.—10 talents of silver, 90 talents of copper, 30 talents of iron, 300 brightly colored wool and linen garments, 300 cattle, 3,000 sheep, 200 cedar logs, two homers of cedar resin, and his daughter with her rich dowry. I laid upon him as his tribute 10 minas of silver, 100 cedar logs, a homer of cedar resin, which I received annually. I accepted from Aramu, son of Agûsi,—10 minas of gold, 6 talents of silver, 500 cattle, 5,000 sheep. From Sangara, of Carchemish I received,—three talents of gold, 70 talents of silver, 30 talents of copper, 100 talents of iron, 20 talents of purple wool, 500 weapons, his daughter, with dowry, along with 100 of his nobles’ daughters, 500 cattle, and 5,000 sheep. I imposed on him as tribute—one mina of gold, one talent of silver, two talents of purple wool, received annually. I accepted an annual tribute from Katazilu of Kummuhu,—20 minas of silver, and 300 cedar logs.

Bronze Gates of Balâwât

BAND 4

(upper register) Attacked Dabigu, the city of Ahûni, son of Adini

BAND 5

(upper register) Tribute from the Unkians

BAND 6

(upper register) Tribute from Sangara of Charchemish

Fragments of the royal annals

A. FROM ASSUR

634 2. (KAH II #113.1 (obv.)) In my second year I left Nineveh for Til-Bursip. I destroyed, devastated, and set fire to Ahûni’s cities. I trapped him in his city, and then crossed the Euphrates at its flood. In my second campaign, I advanced against Dabigu, a fortress of Hatti, together with its nearby cities, and against the rest of the cities of all of those countries. I destroyed, devastated, and set fire to them. Then I received the tribute from all the kings who live on the other side of the Euphrates, establishing my might and power over all lands.

The Black Obelisk inscription

(32–35) In my second year, I approached Til-barzip, capturing the cities of Ahûni, son of Adini, and trapping him In his city. Then I crossed the Euphrates at its flood, and captured Dabigu, a fortified city of Hatti, along with its nearby towns.

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